War Memorials

When the First World War came to an end in November 1918, war graves were scattered throughout all of the regions where fighting had occurred. The locations and sites of many graves were no longer known, and individuals still lay unburied in areas where fighting had been heaviest.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission was set up to provide perpetual commemoration to those who had died while serving in the Commonwealth forces during the war.

They were tasked with searching for the graves and remains of the war dead and conducting the battlefield exhumation and reburials which resulted.

Where burials had occurred in established burial grounds with clearly marked graves, the graves were simply recorded and registered. In most other circumstances, the bodies required exhumation and reburial, during which process attempts were made to identify the individuals.

Old battlefields were searched for small cemeteries (usually of less than 40 graves), isolated graves and the previously unburied dead. All of those found were gathered into ‘concentration’ cemeteries, either newly created or built up around already existing burial grounds.

Dead Man’s Penny for Pte Charles Edward Woodward


“…it had a hole drilled in the top as it was hanged on a wall at his parent’s home

Dead Man’s Penny

In 1916 a committee was set up to arrange for memorial plaques, to be given to relatives of men and women whose deaths were attributable to the Great War 1914-18.

More than a million plaques were made and were often the only memento families had of their loved ones.

MP David Morris (Morecombe and Lunesdale) came across one such plaque (or Dead Man’s Penny as they became known) at a car boot sale a few years ago and following investigation it was traced to Pte. Woodward’s family and presented to the Franklin Hall, Spilsby as part of a display to commemorate his part in the War.

David Morris said, “Pte. Woodward’s memorial touched me as it had a hole drilled in the top as it was hanged on a wall at his parent’s home”.

The full display can be seen at The Franklin Hall, Spilsby.


Our Virtual War Memorial

Concentration

When the First World War came to an end in November 1918, war graves were scattered throughout all of the regions where fighting had occurred. The locations and sites of many graves were no longer known, and individuals still lay unburied in areas where fighting had been heaviest.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission was set up to provide perpetual commemoration to those who had died while serving in the Commonwealth forces during the war.

They were tasked with searching for the graves and remains of the war dead and conducting the battlefield exhumation and reburials which resulted.

Where burials had occurred in established burial grounds with clearly marked graves, the graves were simply recorded and registered. In most other circumstances, the bodies required exhumation and reburial, during which process attempts were made to identify the individuals.

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More military history associated with Halton Holegate